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The Ernie Kovacs Show (comedy)

     [aka: "Kovacs Unlimited"]

     (CBS Primetime, 1952 - 1953;
      NBC Primetime, 1956)


Theme: "Oriental Blues"

    [as per entry in "Rags & Ragtime--a Musical History" --
     ML 3561, R33J29, this piece is based upon "Rialto Ripples"
     by the teenage George Gershwin collaborating with Walter
     Donaldson. Comparison of the melodies verifies that the
     "A" themes of both pieces are nearly identical.
     
     Although  the erstwhile "composer" of the piece is listed
     as Jack Newlon who also promoted and published it, credit 
     for arranging "Oriental Blues" is given to Billy James.]

     Adapters/Arrangers: Richard ("Jack") Newlon (ASCAP), and
                         arranged by Billy James (ASCAP)
     
     Original Publisher: Jack Newlon Pub. Co. (ASCAP)
                            of Glenside, PA
                         
     Sheet Music Pub:    Top Tunes Co.,
                            of Ocean, NJ;
                         selling agent: 
                         Keys Music, Inc.
                            of New York, NY
                         
     Later Publishers:   Damian Music Publishing Co. (ASCAP), and
                         Mokell Music (ASCAP)
                         
     1997 Publishers: Damian Music Publishing Co. (ASCAP), and
                         Mokell Music (ASCAP)
                         
     Copyright Dates: 1950, 1951 on sheet music.
     
     Recordings:
          78rpm single: Top Tunes 443 (1952)
                        Tony De Simone Trio

          78rpm single: Decca 29183
                        Tony De Simone Trio

          45rpm single: Epic 9059
                        Tony De Simone

          45rpm single: MGM 12408 (1957)
                        Leroy Holmes and his Tugboat Eight

          also recorded by Jan August

     Reissues:
          CD: "The Ernie Kovacs Record Collection"
              [contains reissues of versions #1 and #4 above]
               Varese Sarabande VSD 5789  (1997)


Nairobi Trio Skit Theme: "Song of the Nairobi Trio" [aka "Sol-feg-gi-o"]

    [aka: "Sol-feg-gi-o (The Do-Re-Mi Song)"]

    [this was used on a regular, surrealistic, comedy skit 
     on the Kovacs Show in which three characters dressed in 
     monkey suits sat at musical instruments playing a slow,
     almost random tune. This quirky tune caught on and became 
     a popular instrumental novelty. Later, lyrics were added 
     and the piece was reborn with a new name, "Sol-feg-gi-o".]
     
     Composers: Robert Maxwell (ASCAP), 
                with lyrics added later by Carl Sigman (ASCAP)
                
     Original Publisher: Robbins Music Corp. (ASCAP)
     
     1997 Publisher:   EMI Robbins Catalog, Inc. (ASCAP),
                         c/o EMI Music Publishing Inc. 
                         of New York, NY
                         
     Copyright Date:
     
     Recordings:
          78rpm single: "Song of the Nairobi Trio" [instrumental]
                         The Nairobi Trio

          45rpm single: "Song of the Nairobi Trio" [instrumental]
                         Music Mill 45-105 (1961)
                         The Fortune Tellers

          45rpm single: "Sol-feg-gi-o" [partly vocal version]
                         MGM 11671 (1953)
                         Robert Maxwell, his Harp and Orchestra,
                         with the Ray Charles Singers

     Reissues:
          CD: "The Ernie Kovacs Record Collection"
              [contains reissues of version #3 above]
               Varese Sarabande VSD 5789  (1997)


Percy Dovetonsils Skit Theme: "Celestial Nocturne"

    [the middle section of this piece, arranged for the etherial
     sound of the electronic theremin on the LP recording, was 
     used behind a regular comedy spot which featured Kovacs
     as the over-sensitive Percy Dovetonsils, reader of poetry.]
     
     Composers: Harry Revel (ASCAP), and
                Buddy Feyne (ASCAP)
                
     Original Publisher: Michael H. Goldsen, Inc. (ASCAP)
     
     1997 Publisher:   Michael H. Goldsen, Inc. (ASCAP)
                         of Hollywood, CA
                         
     Copyright Date:
     
     Recordings:
          LP: "Music Out of the Moon"
               Les Baxter, His Chorus and Orchestra
               with Dr. Samuel J. Hoffman, theremin
               Capitol 390 (1946)

     Reissues:
          CD: "The Ernie Kovacs Record Collection"
               Varese Sarabande VSD 5789  (1997)


general fast activity music: "Saxophobia"

    [Saxophone virtuoso Rudy Wiedoeft (1893 - 1940) 
     composed this novelty tune classic, and even recorded it
     in 1951.]

     Composer: Rudy C. Wiedoeft (ASCAP)

     Original Publisher: Robbins Music Corp. (ASCAP)
     
     1997 Publisher:  [public domain]
     
     Copyright Date:
     
     Recordings:
          78rpm single: by Rudy Wiedoeft's Californians
                       (circa 1916 - 1924)

          LP: "Saxophobia"
               Clancy's Clowns
               Capitol 1614 (1951)

     Reissues:
          CD: "The Ernie Kovacs Record Collection"
              [contains reissue of version #2 above]
               Varese Sarabande VSD 5789  (1997)


a sentimental ballad: "There's a Little Spark of Love Still Burning"

    [ASCAP title: "Theres Little Spark of Love"

     Contributor Mark Johnson wrote in March, 2005, that Ernie used this
     1914 sentimental ballad beginning with his early local broadcasts  
     in Philadelphia during the 1950's, right through his final days
     on network TV circa 1961/62; and that the version Ernie used
     was a 1915 78rpm Victor ("Talking Machine") acoustic disc by 
     Henry Burr. Henry Burr was the pseudonym of Harry McClaskey who
     recorded under both names. He was called "the dean of ballad 
     singers", and sang with several groups also on various labels,
     including The Peerless Quartet.
        
     Fred Fisher (1845 - 1942) was a German immigrant who co-wrote
     the hit "Peg O'My Heart" the year before -- in 1913; In 1919 Fisher
     published under his own name the song "Dardanella", which he bought 
     for his publishing company from the true authors. He also hit it big 
     in 1922 with the song "Chicago", which became a Sinatra smash over 25 
     years later.
     
     Lyricist Joe McCarthy (1885 - 1943) was 40 years younger than Fisher, his 
     collaborator; He was just 29 at the time they collaborated on this song; 
     McCarthy went on to write the hit waltz "Alice Blue Gown" (1919);
     and eventually penned a lyric for the pop song "I'm Always Chasing 
     Rainbows", based upon the haunting melody from the middle section of 
     Chopin's piano showpiece "Fantasie Impromptu". 
     
     By the way, this Joe McCarthy was no relation to the infamous Senator 
     Joseph Raymond McCarthy who instigated the Communist scare of the 1950s.
     This Joe McCarthy became a director of ASCAP -- the first U.S. performance 
     rights organization.]

     Composers: music by Fred Fisher (ASCAP),
                lyric by Joseph ("Joe") McCarthy, Sr. (ASCAP)

     Original Publisher: Leo Feist, Inc. (ASCAP)
     
     1997 Publisher: Leo Feist, Inc. (ASCAP)
     
     2005 Publisher: EMI-Feist Catalog, Inc. (ASCAP)
                     div. of EMI-April Music, Inc.
                     c/o EMI Music Publishing
                     New York, NY
                     
     Composition Date: 1914.
     
     Copyright Date:
     
     Recordings:
          78rpm single: by Henry Burr
                       (circa 1915, on Victor)


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